How To Wear Hearing Aids With Glasses?

Do you wear glasses? If so, you might be wondering how to wear hearing aids with glasses. It can be a little tricky, but it’s definitely doable! In this blog post, we will discuss the best ways to wear hearing aids with glasses. We’ll also provide some tips for making the process a little bit easier. So, if you’re looking for advice on how to wear your hearing aids and glasses together, read on.

The Problem With Hearing Aids And Glasses

Hearing Aids and Glasses

If you wear glasses and hearing aids, you know that they can sometimes get in the way of each other. Hearing aids are bulky and can cause your glasses to slip down your nose.

Additionally, the wires on hearing aids can get tangled up in your hair or clothing. And let’s not forget about those pesky ear hooks! They can be a real pain, especially when you’re trying to put your glasses on or take them off. But there are ways to overcome these challenges.

Types of Hearing Aids

There are three main types of hearing aids: behind-the-ear (BTE), in-the-ear (ITE), and receiver-in-canal (RIC). BTE hearing aids are the largest type of hearing aid, and they sit behind your ear. ITE hearing aids are smaller and fit inside your ear canal. RIC hearing aids are similar to BTEs, but they have a thin wire that runs down into your ear canal. Learn how to wear hearing aids here.

Behind The Ear Aid

The most popular type of hearing aid is the behind-the-ear (BTE) style. BTEs are larger than other types of hearing aids, but they offer a number of benefits. First, they’re very durable and can withstand a lot of wear and tear. Additionally, BTEs are easier to put on and take off than other types of hearing aids.

There are also a few disadvantages to BTEs. First, they’re more visible than other types of hearing aids. Second, they can be uncomfortable to wear for long periods of time. Finally, BTEs can be more difficult to insert into your ear canal.

Wearing Behind-The-Ear Aid With Glasses

If you think you’re comfortable wearing a behind-the-ear device then you would be glad to know that they go well with glasses. The only downside is that you would have to be extra careful when taking off your glasses.

  • Speak with your optician about which model would suit you best. There are clip-on options that keep the earpiece in place, or you could go for a glasses-compatible hearing aid that has a special mount.
  • Practice taking off your glasses so you can do it quickly and smoothly. The last thing you want is to be fumbling around with your glasses and hearing aid at the same time.
  • You should wear your aid before putting on your glasses. This will give you a chance to adjust the volume and make sure everything is working properly. Putting on your glasses first will make it more difficult to see what you’re doing. It’s also important to remember that you should never force your hearing aid into place. If it’s not going in easily, stop and ask for help.
  • Consult with your audiologist regarding the size and share of your BTE hearing aid. You want to make sure that it doesn’t protrude and is comfortable when you wear your glasses.

Receiver-In-Canal

Receiver-in-canal (RIC) hearing aids are similar to BTEs, but they have a thin wire that runs down into your ear canal. RICs are less visible than BTEs, and they’re also more comfortable to wear for long periods of time.

However, RICs can be more difficult to insert into your ear canal. Additionally, the wires on RICs can get tangled up in your hair or clothing.

Wearing Receiver-In-Canal Aid With Glasses

If you wear glasses, you’ll need to be careful when putting them on and taking them off. The wire on a RIC hearing aid can get caught on the temple piece of your glasses.

To avoid this, practice taking off your glasses so you can do it quickly and smoothly. The last thing you want is to be fumbling around with your glasses and hearing aid at the same time.

You should wear your aid before putting on your glasses. This will give you a chance to adjust the volume and make sure everything is working properly. Putting on your glasses first will make it more difficult to see what you’re doing. It’s also important to remember that you should never force your hearing aid into place. If it’s not going in easily, stop and ask for help.

In-The-Ear

In-the-ear (ITE) hearing aids are smaller than BTEs and fit inside your ear canal. ITE hearing aids are less visible than BTEs, and they’re also more comfortable to wear for long periods of time.

However, ITE hearing aids can be more difficult to insert into your ear canal. Additionally, the wires on ITE hearing aids can get tangled up in your hair or clothing.

Wearing In-The-Ear Aid With Glasses

Wearing glasses with an ITC hearing aid is the easiest as they don’t sit outside your ears, hence they don’t affect your ability to wear glasses. ITC is ideal for people who don’t want the hassle of adjusting both their hearing aid and glasses all the time.

Conclusion

Since there are different types of hearing aids available in the market, their guides on how to wear hearing aids with glasses differ. In the article, we have tried to provide a basic guide for BTW, RIC, and ITC hearing aids.

Do you have any hearing aid? How do you find it working with glasses? Let us know in the comments below.

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